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.tif rendering?


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#1 aapbe

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Posted 03 January 2005 - 08:38 AM

Hi,
Just discovered this great program a couple of weeks ago.
Just one question though: When I save a file as .tif, it appears the file gets saved at 96dpi.
I've always thought that .tif was for printing purposes, hence 300 dpi.
Or am I missing something?

#2 Das Texture

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Posted 03 January 2005 - 10:51 AM

Welcome! I'm glad the Wood Workshop has been working out for you. :)

If I understand the whole dpi thing correctly, the exact same pixels are saved to the file in any case, with the dpi simply being a recommendation that is saved along with the file for other software and printers to understand how large physically the image is supposed to be. Textures are most often used on-screen, which is often considered to be 96 dpi, so one could argue that if you did decide to print a texture you'd want it to appear on paper a similar size to what it would appear on screen.

Of course one can make other equally valid arguments why different dpi settings are cool. Because the choice of dpi ultimately seemed arbitrary, we just left the default alone, not being able to come up with an argument why any one dpi would make more sense than all the other ones. However if we've made a mistake here or if this issue is slowing down your workflow in any way and you would like a different dpi to be the default, please let me know.

Das

#3 aapbe

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Posted 03 January 2005 - 11:19 AM

Hi Das,

If this would be in any kind possible, meaning having .tif files rendered with 300 DPI, we would be most grateful.

#4 Das Texture

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Posted 03 January 2005 - 11:36 AM

Just to make absolutely sure we're on the same page, have you tried increasing the render resolution before rendering your texture? That will add as much detail into the image as you need.

Das

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#5 Linker

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Posted 06 January 2005 - 04:12 PM

Hi!

I'm not sure, but I think maybe there's a typical DPI misunderstanding going on here.

Many people working with a focus towards print-related publishing think that DPI is an indication of the quality of an image. It is not, DPI is only an indication of the relationship between an image's pixel-size and its default print-size. The quality of an image is determined solely by the image's pixel-size. A 1024*1024 72 DPI image is 100% identical to a 1024*1024 300 DPI image, only the 300 DPI one by default prints at 3,413 inches wide, and the 72 DPI one at 14,222 inches wide. An image can be resized for print in any paint software, like Photoshop or publishing software like InDesign without loosing the image-quality.

P.S. Of course an image will lose print-quality if printed at a size which gives it a DPI which is lower than what is recomended for the printer in question. Which is, for example, 170 DPI for most domestic 600 DPI Ink-Jet printers and 150 DPI for commercial large-batch print-houses that run their printers at 300 DPI. (There is only a loose connection between the optimal image DPI for the actual printed DPI of a printer.)

P.P.S. Yes, this is very confusing, and one usually needs to be confronted with the problem(s) several times to begin to understand it. /blinkNew members can't link' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':unsure:' />




edit: typo

Edited by Linker, 06 January 2005 - 04:16 PM.





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